Gone detoxifying

Long story short: I was put on a diet for 2 weeks! Eeeek! And not just any diet. One of the crazy ones; fruit-and-veg-only diet. I was told that I need to recharge and rejuvenate my system. Apparently my body needs to come out of what might be called “civilisation disease”. There’s no vacuum or mop needed for this little ritual. It means eating fruits and veggies only which push everything thing else out of your system. You get the picture! Today has been day #7.

Here is the diet: for 14 days, I eat 500-600 kcals, no carbs, no sugar, no dairy, no fat, no protein, no alcohol, no meat, no fish, no coffee – shall I continue? Instead, I can eat only grapefruits, apples, kiwis, lemons, watermelons and all veggies, except potatoes, beans and chickpea.

Today has been day 7 and I feel I have already emerged from the experience with a new healthier feel and a few lessons which I’ve decided to share with you;

#1 Starving yourself really sucks for two days … and then you get used to it. I should clarify: this diet doesn’t really require you to starve yourself, you can technically eat as much as you want. But what you’re eating isn’t that filling, what you want you can’t have hence all you think about for first two days is how stupid it is that you can’t even have chia pudding, which always seemed like the healthiest thing you could eat. And then, on day #3, something changed. Perhaps I was already so sick of apples and carrots that I’d lost interest in the concept of food entirely. But more likely, it was simply that weird evolutionary principle that humans can get used to anything. And it’s why, after only 48 hours, I was already starting to accept eating like a rabbit. And I stopped being hungry. You get used to it!

#2 Going completely without coffee requires a massive revamping of your daily habits. I love a good cup of coffee. Going totally “sober”, for health requires very strong will! 

#3 I could never be a vegetarian. I could never be a vegetarian simply because meat is just too tasty, even when you take away all the butter, sauces and stuff it’s usually drenched in. Tastiness however is relative. For the first few days, I hated everything I ate, because I still remembered what a steak tasted like. But by day #4, I’d forgotten whatever happiness I once knew. 

#4 I’ve come to appreciate apples (with cinnamon!). Just as I would save the chicken on my plate to reward myself for eating the broccoli (as a child of course), I began to save my precious apples with cinnamon for dessert.

#5 Herbs save your butt. This diet has taken me on a culinary history trip to a time when most food was bland and terrible, and herbs were the grand cover-up. You wouldn’t think it, but a butternut squash soup (no stock!), seasoned with a handful of fresh dill isn’t half bad. 

loaf_story_diet

#6 It’s important to pick a diet that fits your style. To stick with any diet, that diet has to match a person’s personality. I don’t think I could permanently cut down on chocolate or Bunsen Burgers, but to give all of them up entirely for two weeks is now like a dare. 

Recapping full details of these past 7 days in one blog post is not going to happen, however you should be able to get the gist that it’s an adventure, with waves of confronting thoughts to leave you empowered to make new choices. My one and only goal has been to make an effort to clear my body of toxins. Yes, it has been painful at times but boy has it been frickin eye-opening, enlightening and a true experience that has taught me so much about myself. I feel like I’ve figured out why Plato and Socrates and Gandhi did it – the clarity of thought, the peacefulness.
As far as whether I’d do it again, well… we’ll see.